Professor Pete Alexander

A seasoned professional with over 35 years of Sales, Marketing, Educational and Entrepreneurial experience, Pete has battled the negative effects of stress head-on and has developed the LIGHTEN™ stress relief model that motivates his peers to better protect their health and handle challenging situations with grace and success.
A seasoned professional with over 35 years of Sales, Marketing, Educational and Entrepreneurial experience, Pete has battled the negative effects of stress head-on and has developed the LIGHTEN™ stress relief model that motivates his peers to better protect their health and handle challenging situations with grace and success.
Stress Relief Tool – Overcoming Your Inner Critic

Stress Relief Tool – Overcoming Your Inner Critic

We all have one – that inner voice that tells us that “we are not good enough.” I know that this limited my opportunities many times in my career, and it is a common issue I hear from my clients, friends and family.

Our inner critic stems from expectations put on us by our parents, school systems, bosses and close family members who we want to impress. And when we don’t live up to those expectations, we often feel like we failed.

Sound familiar? It was certainly my script for most of my life.

If this resonates with you, consider a visualization activity that can help. You might remember that I wrote about the power of visualization in one of my first blogs. If visualization works for you, it can be used to overcome your inner critic simply by imaging your younger self as follows:

  1. Close your eyes, take a deep breath in, and go to a place you like to relax. Maybe it is the beach, a lake, a park, your backyard – wherever it is that you would consider your happy place.
  2. Now imagine your current self looking at your younger self – young enough that you still are impressionable. Maybe that age is 5, 7, 10 – whatever age you remember being most happy.
  3. Now as your current self, open your eyes and write down the characteristics of your younger self that you most admire. What is it about your younger self that made you confident and happy?
  4. Review this list and recognize that this is who you are deep down inside.
  5. Keep this list handy any time you doubt yourself – reminding yourself that your inner child within your adult self can tap into qualities you might have forgotten you had.

The self-discovery you uncover about yourself using this activity can help you gain confidence and reduce your stress in the process.

Image by John Hain from Pixabay 

Please note that there is no guarantee a particular stress relief tool will work for you. Thus you must take complete responsibility for using them and for your own physical and emotional wellbeing. Further, Professor Pete Alexander is not a licensed health professional. Please consult qualified health practitioners regarding your use of any stress relief technique. Medical advice must only be obtained from a physician or qualified health practitioner.

Posted by Professor Pete Alexander in Stress Relief Tools, 0 comments
Guest Post: Pandemic Reset – Life Changes for Good

Guest Post: Pandemic Reset – Life Changes for Good

Like almost everyone, you’re probably coming through a period of profound disruption. The pandemic has led to a great deal of change in people’s lives — some of it mandated by public health measures, and some of it motivated by wanting to cope better with stress. It may be a moment to figure out daily routines that make sense for you and your family, and to finally realize a few dreams.

Strive for Personal Well-Being

One of the most important lessons of the pandemic is that personal health and well-being are everything. Many people with traditional jobs live with crazy amounts of stress. Add in a family to care for and a pandemic, and it’s obvious that a fundamental shift is needed as continuous extreme stress can impact your health significantly.

Real change may require reduced work hours, getting a new profession, or staying remote rather than returning to the office. Stress can also be reduced using methods such as exercise and following a balanced diet free of junk and excess calories.

Improve Your Home Environment

Lockdowns and quarantines forced many to re-think their living spaces and how to better equip them for hosting school, work, and recreation under one roof. Setting aside an area to practice yoga or meditation, or dedicating a calm and organized space in which to work, can do wonders for your productivity and state of mind. Declutter, and stick with a calming color palette and comfortable furniture for best results.

Formalize Side Hustles and Hobbies

You know what you love doing. So, why not make a living at it? Starting your own business can be stressful, but if it’s simply formalizing a lucrative side hustle or hobby, this can be a good kind of stress that helps you grow as a person. Best of all, you set the terms for how your business is run. There are lots of DIY resources to help you get started.

Marketing your new business can be as simple as designing and printing a memorable business card using a handy free business card maker. Add your own text, images, fonts, and colors. Then, establish a digital presence by posting about your business on social media. That way, you’re promoting your new endeavor in the physical and the virtual world at a pace you can manage.

Don’t Forget the Outside World

When your life, your most important relationships, and your work are all contained within your home, it can be easy to forget the world outside your front door. But it’s important for mental health reasons to continue connecting with friends and pursuing fun activities. Go for a walk, meet a friend for coffee, or attend a play or concert — these types of activities can reduce stress, prevent burnout, restore perspective, and enhance a sense of security once you get back home.

Tips and Tricks To Beat Stress

Wrangling stress is a lifelong challenge for many, and can become more acute in times of crisis. It’s well worth taking steps to get stress under control to enjoy better relationships, increased productivity, and better health. Check out these additional ideas for helping you manage your stress better.

About The Author

Dylan Foster
dylan@healthwellwise.com

Image via Pexels

Please note that there is no guarantee a particular stress relief tool will work for you. Thus you must take complete responsibility for using them and for your own physical and emotional wellbeing. Further, Professor Pete Alexander is not a licensed health professional. Please consult qualified health practitioners regarding your use of any stress relief technique. Medical advice must only be obtained from a physician or qualified health practitioner.

Posted by Professor Pete Alexander in Stress Relief Tools, 0 comments
Stress Relief Tool – Don’t Overthink Things

Stress Relief Tool – Don’t Overthink Things

If you are anything like me, the temptation to overthink things can really be a problem. Often referred to as “analysis paralysis”, when we overthink things, we can create problems for ourselves such as:

And when we overthink things, we don’t stay in the present moment with our surroundings – we overlook the benefit of stopping to smell the roses because we are too focused on the worry associated with whatever it is we are overthinking.

A great way to help alleviate overthinking is to exercise regularly, even if it is a simple walk in nature. I’ve found that connecting with nature helps clarify my thoughts. You might even want to try a walking meditation in nature to help sooth your mind from all those thoughts.

So next time you catch yourself overthinking things, go for a walk to help alleviate some of your stress.

Image by mohamed Hassan from Pixabay 

Please note that there is no guarantee a particular stress relief tool will work for you. Thus you must take complete responsibility for using them and for your own physical and emotional wellbeing. Further, Professor Pete Alexander is not a licensed health professional. Please consult qualified health practitioners regarding your use of any stress relief technique. Medical advice must only be obtained from a physician or qualified health practitioner.

Posted by Professor Pete Alexander in Stress Relief Tools, 0 comments
Stress Relief Tool – Overcome A Noisy Mind

Stress Relief Tool – Overcome A Noisy Mind

I remember when I first tried meditating. I sat there relaxed and listened to a guided meditation that was less than 10 minutes. Yet, that seemed like the longest 10 minutes of my life because my mind was bouncing around with all this distracting noise. Instead of being less stressed, ironically, I felt even more stressed because I wasn’t doing meditating “right”. Gotta love that perfectionist mentality!

Fortunately, over the years I have learned ways to calm my noisy mind, and now enjoy meditating at least once every day for 10-20 minutes per session. And when I notice my mind starting to get distracted, rather than criticizing myself for it I just acknowledge it happening and bring myself back to center to continue my meditation.

But what if you are experiencing a noisy mind at other points during the day, such as during a meeting or conversation you are having with someone else? Here are a few ideas that have helped me minimize the noise in those situations:

  • Journaling – sometimes it is just thoughts that need to get out of your head, and journaling, when consistently used, works great.
  • Schedule worry time – often our noisy mind is because we are anxious about something. If we tell our minds that a certain time of the day is dedicated to worrying, you get into the habit of calming the noise until the appropriate time.
  • Deep breathing – by consciously slowing your breathing down, you tell your body and mind that it is okay to calm down.
  • Laughing – it is a great way to release positive hormones and clear your mind, sharpening it and giving you heightened concentration.
  • Affirmations – a great way to redivert your thinking patterns in a more effective and productive direction, especially before an event you may perceive as stressful.

So next time your mind feels noisy, try one of these ideas and enjoy a more calm and peaceful experience and the stress relief that comes with it.

 

Image by John Hain from Pixabay 

Please note that there is no guarantee a particular stress relief tool will work for you. Thus you must take complete responsibility for using them and for your own physical and emotional wellbeing. Further, Professor Pete Alexander is not a licensed health professional. Please consult qualified health practitioners regarding your use of any stress relief technique. Medical advice must only be obtained from a physician or qualified health practitioner.

Posted by Professor Pete Alexander in Stress Relief Tools, 0 comments
Guest Post – Simple Tips for Moving Your Family to a New City

Guest Post – Simple Tips for Moving Your Family to a New City

If your family is moving to a new city to rebuild your lives from a low point, or if you simply need a change of scenery, then you’re in for an adventure. Relocating can be life-changing, thrilling, stressful, and lonely—all at the same time.

The key to making a smooth transition and laying a solid foundation in your new community is to plan, prepare, and step out of your comfort zone while fostering your health and wellbeing along the way. To help you get ready for this new chapter and not let the stress overwhelm you, try some of these practical tips.

Research Locations    

Unless you’ve already decided where to move, dedicate time to diligently research potential locations. Consider several factors when determining the best place for your family, including:

While you may not find a city that meets every one of your needs and wants, try not to settle for a place that will not allow your family to flourish.

Find Housing

The next task is to find housing for your family. As for choosing a city, you will want to consider many factors to determine what type of home will best accommodate your needs and preferences. For instance, decide if you wish to live in a house, an apartment, a condo, or another style of home. Then, research the local housing market to see what options you are working with.

If you hope to purchase a home, do everything you can to prepare for the process. Along with researching the market, find a reputable real estate agent to reduce your stress and guide you to find and close on the ideal home.

You will also want to learn what lenders will expect from you, such as maintaining healthy credit and getting preapproved for a mortgage. Moreover, take time to figure out how much home you can realistically afford for the next few years.

Say you are moving to Seattle and don’t want to buy a home. Fortunately, you won’t be hard-pressed to find an excellent apartment rental in Seattle. Search online for apartments in your price range that provide the amenities, features, and layout that will allow your family to live safely and comfortably. You can even take 3D tours on many properties, which can help you envision life in the apartment better.

Head to Town

When you have arrived in your new city, begin exploring the local establishments and find places you want to frequent. One stress-free way to do this is to make a list of food, activities, and other needs your family has and try one new place every few days.

Make Friends    

We are social beings, and it’s essential to have relationships outside of our immediate families. Using social media, throwing a housewarming party, and taking walks through the neighborhood are some practical ways to accomplish this. Be intentional about meeting your neighbors, and see if any of them have children the same age as yours.

Keep a Self-Care Routine

Finally, make sure that each person in your household is maintaining a self-care routine as you transition into the next chapter. Along with regular exercise and a nutritious diet, find relaxing activities to do in the evening that can help you unwind and get the restful sleep you need. Also, plan calming activities to do as a family at a local park, museum, or even in your backyard.

Moving to a new city is exhilarating, but it can also be stressful. Be sure to research locations and housing options before committing to your relocation. Find local establishments your family loves, and start making friends soon after arriving in your new community. And make sure your family is practicing self-care as you deal with the stress of the move.

About the Author

Jenna Sherman
Parent-Leaders.com

Image via Pexels

Please note that there is no guarantee a particular stress relief tool will work for you. Thus you must take complete responsibility for using them and for your own physical and emotional wellbeing. Further, Professor Pete Alexander is not a licensed health professional. Please consult qualified health practitioners regarding your use of any stress relief technique. Medical advice must only be obtained from a physician or qualified health practitioner.

Posted by Professor Pete Alexander in Stress Relief Tools, 0 comments
Stress Relief Tool – Resist Being A People Pleaser

Stress Relief Tool – Resist Being A People Pleaser

Most people want to be liked, but the reality is that not everyone is going to like you – and that’s a good lesson to learn. I have a note on my desk that reminds me that I’m not liked by everyone because I am not pizza.

Trying to be liked by everyone is basically a people pleaser. A people pleaser is someone who tries hard to make others happy. They will often go out of their way to please someone, even if it means taking their own valuable time or resources away from them. People pleasers often act out of insecurity and a lack of self-esteem. They can often be perfectionists, but soon realize they cannot do it all.

If any of this sounds like you, consider the following ideas that can help you resist being a people pleaser:

  • Set proper boundaries. Remember that saying “no” allows you to say “yes” to the things that you truly want to do or really need to do.
  • Clarify expectations of what you are being asked to do before deciding whether or not to say yes.
  • Prioritize yourself first. This was an important lesson for me – especially growing up in a severely dysfunctional family. The reality is if you don’t take care of yourself, who’s going to do it? If you lose your health because you put everyone else first, what good will you be to others if all you have the energy to do is lie in bed recovering? And if it feels like you are disappointing the other person, do a forgiveness activity so you don’t carry any guilt after properly putting yourself first.

By implementing one or more of these techniques, you will minimize your people pleaser tendencies and reduce your stress in the process.

 

Image courtesy of Science of People.

Please note that there is no guarantee a particular stress relief tool will work for you. Thus you must take complete responsibility for using them and for your own physical and emotional wellbeing. Further, Professor Pete Alexander is not a licensed health professional. Please consult qualified health practitioners regarding your use of any stress relief technique. Medical advice must only be obtained from a physician or qualified health practitioner.

 

Posted by Professor Pete Alexander in Stress Relief Tools, 2 comments
Guest Post – Confidence Is King – Rebuilding Self-Belief After COVID-19

Guest Post – Confidence Is King – Rebuilding Self-Belief After COVID-19

In recent years, many people have lost self-confidence – and can you blame them? COVID-19 and the economic hardship it caused have led to sweeping changes in both personal and public lives. But the pandemic is on the way out, and it is possible to rebuild your self-confidence and live your best life as we collectively reintegrate with society.

Not sure where to start? Professor Pete Alexander’s blog has over 100 different ways to help you boost your self-confidence and rebuild belief in yourself so you can achieve your goals with gusto.

Implement Destress Routines

For starters, consider destress routines every time you come home from work or when you feel anxious or tired. Destressing routines can include:

  • Meditating regularly to clear your mind of problematic thoughts
  • Enjoying a recreational hobby
  • Having at least one friend or family member who you can vent to when the going gets tough
  • Listening to calming music when you get home from work
  • Replacing certain decorations in your home or apartment with pleasing alternatives, like green plants.

Keeping your stress levels low is key to building yourself back up and pursuing your goals with vigor.

Get (and Stay) Fit

Exercise is key to a healthy body, but it’s also important for a healthy mind! The healthiest, least stressed individuals are those who maintain excellent exercise routines, including cardio workouts and lifting regimens.

If you get and stay fit, you’ll feel better and look better at the same time. Plus, your self-confidence will skyrocket because you’ll be more physically capable in practical terms, as well.

Make a Career Shift

For many, a job is just something to bring home money. But you can start off this new step in your journey the right way by deciding what career you want for your professional future and going for it!

Making a career shift is the best way to get out of the COVID funk and get back on track to pursuing your goals. Lots of people had their career ambitions or goals stalled because of the pandemic. But it’s time to get back on the proverbial horse and chase your dreams. Consider tackling a new career ASAP, especially if your current job is making you stressed.

If the ideal career for you isn’t yet in reach, consider going back to school to boost your career prospects. Online degrees in psychology, for example, will allow you to learn key skills like research methods, data analysis and organization, and important elements of human psychological processes and habits. Even better, many of the best online degree programs will give you the flexibility you need to complete your education while balancing workplace or family responsibilities.

Redo Your Wardrobe

As visual creatures, we humans also feel better when we look phenomenal. You may be able to trick your mind into thinking “new clothes, new me” when you redo your wardrobe and pick out new clothes that look and feel great on your body.

Redoing your wardrobe can also make you feel confident when you go into a public place or when you show up for a job interview for your new career choice. Have some fun with it, wear something you’ve never worn before, and take a good look at yourself in the mirror. Smile!

Have a New Adventure!

Lastly, you could rebuild your self-confidence and learn to enjoy life again after COVID by taking yourself on a new adventure. Whether it’s taking a short vacation, going on a solo hike, or visiting friends or family members you haven’t seen in years, treat yourself to a journey that promises excitement and pleasure.

Adventures are the best ways to appreciate life in all of its rich color and glory. By getting out of your regular routine, you’ll learn to see the world as it was before the pandemic. Who knows? You may even regain some of your pre-COVID energy once more.

About the Author:

Cheryl Conklin
Wellness Central
cheryl.conklin@wellnesscentral.info

Image via Pexels

Please note that there is no guarantee a particular stress relief tool will work for you. Thus you must take complete responsibility for using them and for your own physical and emotional wellbeing. Further, Professor Pete Alexander is not a licensed health professional. Please consult qualified health practitioners regarding your use of any stress relief technique. Medical advice must only be obtained from a physician or qualified health practitioner.

Posted by Professor Pete Alexander in Stress Relief Tools, 0 comments
Stress Relief Tool – Dealing With A Bad Boss

Stress Relief Tool – Dealing With A Bad Boss

It is likely that sometime in your working career you will report to someone who really shouldn’t be managing people, and maybe some of you reading this have been unlucky to experience more than one bad boss.

When I was co-writing my second book, Money Isn’t All That Matters – Strategies For Attracting And Retaining Technical Professionals, I interviewed dozens of small, medium and large organizations. What I found out from these organizations was that money was important, of course, but there were a whole host of other reasons (both tangible and intangible) that influence a technical professional’s decision to work for an organization – and at the top of that list was his or her relationship with their manager. This was reinforced in a Gallup poll of 7,272 adults, where 50% of respondents said that they left their companies because of their bosses.

A bad boss can have devastating effects on your overall health. I dealt with this firsthand as I ended up in the emergency room and an extended stay in ICU with a severe case of diabetic ketoacidosis (in simple terms my body was eating itself alive) because of how I was reacting to my micro-manager boss.

Sadly, I’m not alone. A study performed by Keas.com found that 77% of employees had experienced physical systems of stress due to a bad boss, with those who had an inconsiderate or uncommunicative manager 60% more likely to suffer heart trauma. The problem is so bad that three out of every four employees report that their boss is the worst part of their job, with 65% saying they would take a new boss over a pay raise.

So, what can you do if you are unlucky enough to report to a bad boss? Here are a few ideas that can help reduce your stress:

  • Set proper boundaries. Learn how to say “no” to requests on your time, which allows you to say “yes” to the things that you truly want to do or really need to do.
  • Clarify expectations. If you have any doubt about a deliverable that you are responsible for, don’t assume you have it right. Clarify expectations (preferably in writing) with your boss to ensure you deliver as expected.
  • Stay one step ahead. Especially with a micro-manager, anticipate the tasks that your manager expects and get them done well ahead of time. That way when your boss reminds you of a particular task, you can confirm its already done. Do this enough times and your micro-manager boss may realize they don’t need to watch your every move.
  • Bonus tip: if you are interviewing for a new job, do everything you can to find out the management tendencies of your potential new boss. You can look on LinkedIn for others who report to that person and connect with them for coffee to learn more about the culture of their organization while also finding out more about what they like and what are the challenges with reporting to that particular individual.

A bad boss is not worth negatively effecting your health. Find at least one idea that helps you reduce your stress, and take it from me – don’t trade your health for your career because that is a very bad trade.

 

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay 

Please note that there is no guarantee a particular stress relief tool will work for you. Thus you must take complete responsibility for using them and for your own physical and emotional wellbeing. Further, Professor Pete Alexander is not a licensed health professional. Please consult qualified health practitioners regarding your use of any stress relief technique. Medical advice must only be obtained from a physician or qualified health practitioner.

Posted by Professor Pete Alexander in Stress Relief Tools, 0 comments
Guest Post – Why Am I Stressed? Effective Ways for Managing Anxiety

Guest Post – Why Am I Stressed? Effective Ways for Managing Anxiety

Anxiety is something that plagues all of us on occasion. Sometimes it’s based in reality, and other times it’s free-floating in nature. Most people who suffer from anxiety have a sense of what triggers attacks. This is a good thing, as it allows you to avoid triggering situations and can help you identify and intervene before anxiety takes over in a disruptive fashion. Watching what you eat and drink can also help you manage stress.

What Is Anxiety?

According to the Department of Health and Human Services, anxiety falls into the family of depressive mental health conditions that share a number of similar characteristics. Anxiety manifests differently in different people, but common symptoms include rapid heartbeat, a sense of “fight, flight or freeze,” or feeling overwhelmed to such a degree that it’s difficult to maintain control of your emotions.

Anxiety can be situational, in that a particular event or activity triggers it, such as being in a crowded room or speaking in public. Free-floating anxiety is a bit more difficult to diagnose, but charting symptoms can help you pinpoint its origins.

What Are Your Triggers?

The first step in combating anxiety is recognizing the triggers that put you in an anxious mood. Eating well, in general, can alleviate a host of health problems, and poor food choices can make you feel stressed. For example, excessive caffeine and alcohol consumption are two top offenders. Fatty processed foods might make you feel temporarily good but can then have a depressive effect.

Fortunately, according to Medical News Today, some foods help reduce anxiety. Next time you feel a panic attack coming on, have a handful of Brazil nuts, a cup of chamomile tea, some magnesium, or even better, indulge in some dark chocolate.

There’s also a connection between anxiety and poor air quality. A study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that polluted air “is associated with an increased risk of  symptoms of anxiety, including fearfulness, desire for avoidance, and tendency to worry.” One source of excessive particulates in the air you breathe in your living space can be a chimney in need of sweeping. Do yourself and your family a favor and search online for “chimney inspection near me” and use Angi.com to find and hire a qualified chimney cleaner. It’s recommended that you have your chimney swept at least once a year.

Social Anxiety

Many people suffer from social anxiety, which it’s mentally and emotionally trying to be in certain situations, especially when you don’t know people, or you struggle with crowded places. This type of anxiety can often be treated through behavioral therapy that helps identify what’s behind the fear or opposition to various environments.

Some of the more common ways to treat anxiety include talk therapy, medication, and behavioral adjustments to the way that we think or perceive situations. Anxiety can sometimes be treated by learning coping techniques to help change our outlook and our reaction to what can be anxiety-producing circumstances.

Work-Related Anxiety

Workplace stress and anxiety are among the more common forms of anxiety and can have numerous layers. You may be anxious about the type of work you’re doing, the people you’re working with, your job security, or any other host of professional concerns.

If your job is causing stress, you should consider going back to school and looking for a career change that feels like a better fit. For example, getting a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice, business, or education can put you in a position of helping others manage their health and wellness. Enrolling in an online program lets you work from the location of your choice on your own timeline. This means you can continue to work, as well as balance school and home life.

Preventing Anxiety Before It Attacks

Once you’re aware of what causes your anxiety, you can take proactive steps to head it off, or at least mitigate some of its impacts once an attack is in progress. For example, if you notice you’re feeling flushed or have clammy hands, you may be in a position to take a brief respite, utilize relaxation techniques, or if necessary, take anti-anxiety medication.

Some types of medication are used to diminish an attack as it’s unfolding, while others serve as a long-term solution, where medication is taken on a regular basis to help regulate your emotions overall. Your primary care physician can conduct an analysis and make recommendations as appropriate.

Many things cause anxiety, from too much screen time, news, and social media overload, to toxic relationships, stressful workplaces, and even just daily life as a human being. However, you don’t have to live with anxiety. Constructive self-care techniques can give you greater control, and in turn, result in a better overall quality of life.

Contact The Author

Cheryl Conklin
Wellness Central

Photo by Pixabay

Please note that there is no guarantee a particular stress relief tool will work for you. Thus you must take complete responsibility for using them and for your own physical and emotional wellbeing. Further, Professor Pete Alexander is not a licensed health professional. Please consult qualified health practitioners regarding your use of any stress relief technique. Medical advice must only be obtained from a physician or qualified health practitioner.

Posted by Professor Pete Alexander in Stress Relief Tools, 0 comments
Stress Relief Tool – Different Types of Rest

Stress Relief Tool – Different Types of Rest

Now that we are in the holidays season, some of us may find that our sleep cycles get out of whack. And we all know how important good sleep is for stress relief.

But did you know that there are seven types of rest? According to TED.com speaker Saundra Dalton-Smith MD, sleep and rest are not the same thing. Rest should equal restoration in seven key areas of your life:

  1. Physical – whether it be passive like sleeping or active like stretching/exercise and getting a massage to help improve your body.
  2. Mental – where microbreaks, journaling and meditation can help calm your noisy mind.
  3. Sensory – bright lights and electronics can lead to sensory overload, so detoxing from technology is important for proper rest.
  4. Creative – especially if you need to brainstorm new ideas as part of your work, creative rest is critical. Spending time in nature and surrounding yourself with colors can be very helpful.
  5. Emotional – the opportunity to freely express your feelings, which can be done in the privacy of your own space using the Emotional Freedom Technique.
  6. Social – it should come as no surprise that negative people suck our energy, while positive people do the opposite. To get this type of proper rest, it is best to avoid negative people and limit your use of social media.
  7. Spiritual – whatever spirituality means to you, doing a daily gratitude exercise can be a game changer in changing your overall outlook.

In her book Sacred Rest, Dr. Daulton-Smith says that determining what type of rest you need starts with evaluating where you’re using energy throughout your day. The areas where you expend the most energy are likely going to be the areas where you need to prioritize rest. For example, if you’re a graphic designer and spend most of your time creating new designs, you’re using a lot of creative energy throughout the day—and, as such, will need to prioritize creative rest. If you’re in the middle of training for a marathon and are running 15 miles every day, your body is going to be exhausted—and you’ll need to get plenty of physical rest to recover.

So next time you are wondering why a solid night’s sleep doesn’t refresh you, take into consideration which type of rest you may actually need in order to reduce your stress and perform at your best.

 

Image by Jill Wellington from Pixabay 

Please note that there is no guarantee a particular stress relief tool will work for you. Thus you must take complete responsibility for using them and for your own physical and emotional wellbeing. Further, Professor Pete Alexander is not a licensed health professional. Please consult qualified health practitioners regarding your use of any stress relief technique. Medical advice must only be obtained from a physician or qualified health practitioner.

Posted by Professor Pete Alexander in Stress Relief Tools, 0 comments